Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options
Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options

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Posts for: December, 2013

By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
December 30, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   bleeding gums  
DontIgnoreBleedingGums-ASignofTroubleAhead

Ninety percent of people have noticed bleeding from their gums when they brush or floss their teeth at some time or other. You may wonder if this is a result of brushing too hard — but that's not usually the case.

If your gums don't hurt — even if they bleed easily — you may think the bleeding is normal, nothing to worry about, or you're brushing too hard.

Bleeding from your gums is not normal!

It is an early warning sign of gum disease. In fact ten percent of those who start with bleeding gums go on to develop serious periodontal disease affecting the support for the teeth leading to tooth loss.

Then why do my gums bleed?

The way you brush your teeth is indeed a factor! Bacteria that normally reside in the mouth (in fact you need them to stay healthy) collect along the gum line in a biofilm. When the biofilm is not removed effectively on a daily basis, over time the gums become inflamed and bleed when touched. Other signs of inflamed gums — gingivitis — are redness and swelling, and even recession.

SO — the problem is not that you are brushing too hard, but that you are not brushing and/or flossing effectively. Both are important.

Three ways to stop bleeding gums before they lead to serious problems

  1. It all starts with brushing your teeth correctly at the gum line. Use a soft multi-tufted toothbrush. Hold it in the gum line and wiggle it gently until the tooth surfaces feel clean to your tongue — just like when you've had a professional cleaning. It doesn't take force, be gentle.
  2. It's just as important to remove biofilm from between the teeth where the toothbrush won't reach. If you are having difficulty flossing, we've got some easy demonstrations and instructional tips.
  3. Remember, as we say, “It's not the brush, it's the hand that holds it.”

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about bleeding gums. Bring your toothbrush and floss with you to our office and ask us to demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums: A very important warning sign of gum disease.”


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
December 27, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: celebrity smiles  
LearnAboutLivingtheLifeYouLovewithDesignerNateBerkus

Design expert and television celebrity Nate Berkus has definite ideas about how to live. In a recent interview, he explained his ideas on design. He also talked about health, and how he keeps his teeth and mouth healthy.

From an initial design makeover that he did eight years ago on the Oprah Winfrey Show, Berkus has gone on to do 127 such makeovers. He was such a success that he now hosts his own daily talk show. He has also developed a line of home products for the Home Shopping Network and has his own design firm, Nate Berkus Associates. His clients include well-known restaurants and hotels as well as private homes. He has written articles for O Magazine and authored a book on the subject of transforming your home into a place you love.

“I realized many years ago that I wasn't going on Oprah to pick sofa colors and paint chips. I was there to lift people up through the way they live,” he says. His secret to design success is to “go with what you love.” He says, “Don't worry about mixing metals, eras or styles. If you love each item, you'll find a way to make it work.”

His common sense practical attitude continues when it comes to dental health. Berkus is blessed with a healthy mouth and teeth. He doesn't feel anxious when visiting the dentist because he usually has a good report. He has not needed orthodontics or cosmetic dentistry. He thanks his childhood dentist for giving him fluoride treatments and sealants, and for teaching him healthy dental hygiene habits.

Berkus brushes his teeth twice or even three times a day, with a manual or electric toothbrush — depending on whether he is at home or traveling. He also follows his dentist's advice about flossing: “Floss the ones you want to keep!” He says that he tried tooth whitening once, but he felt that the whiteness was “too white.” Now he simply works to maintain his natural tooth color and smile.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about maintaining healthy teeth. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nate Berkus, Helping Others Love the Way They Live.”


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
December 12, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: cracked mouth  
TreatingandPreventingCrackedMouthCorners

You may be suffering from an uncomfortable cracking of the skin at the corners of the mouth. This condition is known as perleche (or angular cheilitis). From the French word “lecher” (“to lick”), it derives its name from the tendency of sufferers to lick the affected areas.

There are a number of causes for perleche. It’s found most often in children who drool during sleep, or in teenagers or young adults wearing braces. Older adults develop perleche due to the wrinkling of skin caused by aging; and anyone can develop the condition from environmental factors like cold, dry weather. Conditions from within the mouth may also be a cause: inadequate saliva flow; inflammation caused by dentures; or tooth loss that diminishes facial support and puts pressure on the skin at the corners of the mouth. Systemic conditions such as anemia, diabetes or cancer can dry out oral tissues and membranes, which may lead to perleche.

Our first priority is to treat any underlying infection. Cracked mouth corners are easily infected, most commonly from yeast called candida albicans. The infection may range from minor discomfort localized in the affected area to painful infections that involve the entire mouth and possibly the throat. Any of these can be treated with an oral or topical anti-fungal medication, including anti-fungal ointments applied directly to the corners of the mouth until the infection clears up. Chlorhexidine mouth rinses can also be used to treat minor yeast infections.

As for healing the cracked skin, a steroid ointment for control of inflammation combined with a zinc oxide paste or ointment will serve as an antifungal barrier while the tissues heal. If the condition is related to missing teeth or dentures, we can take steps to replace those teeth or ensure the dentures are fitting properly. Good oral health also goes a long way in preventing further reoccurrence of perleche, as well as dermatological techniques to remove deep wrinkles due to aging.

If you would like more information on perleche and other mouth sore issues, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cracked Corners of the Mouth.”




Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD

 

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