Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options
Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options

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Posts for: October, 2015

By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
October 22, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
AdvancesinPorcelainVeneersImproveBothStrengthandAppearance

One of the best restorative options for slightly deformed, misaligned or stained teeth is a porcelain veneer. Composed of thin, laminated layers of dental material, the veneer is bonded to the outside of the tooth to transform both its shape and color to blend with other natural teeth.

Veneers are more than a technical process — they’re works of art produced by skilled artisans known as dental lab technicians. They use their skills to shape veneers into forms so life-like they can’t be distinguished from other teeth.

How technicians produce veneers depends on the material used. The mainstay for many years was feldspathic porcelain, a powdered material mixed with water to form a paste, which technicians use to build up layers on top of each other. After curing or “firing” in an oven, the finished veneer can mimic both the color variations and translucency of natural teeth.

Although still in use today, feldspathic porcelain does have limitations. It has a tendency to shrink during firing, and because it’s built up in layers it’s not as strong and shatter-resistant as a single composed piece. To address these weaknesses, a different type of veneer material reinforced with leucite came into use in the 1990s. Adding this mineral to the ceramic base, the core of the veneer could be formed into one piece by pressing the heated material into a mold. But while increasing its strength, early leucite veneers were thicker than traditional porcelain and only worked where extra space allowed for them.

This has led to the newest and most advanced form that uses a stronger type of glass ceramic called lithium disilicate. These easily fabricated veneers can be pressed down to a thickness of three tenths of a millimeter, much thinner than leucite veneers with twice the strength.  And like leucite, lithium disilicate can be milled to increase the accuracy of the fit. It’s also possible to add a layer of feldspathic porcelain to enhance their appearance.

The science — and artistry — of porcelain veneers has come a long way over the last three decades. With more durable, pliable materials, you can have veneers that with proper care could continue to provide you an attractive smile for decades to come.

If you would like more information on dental veneers, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers.”


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
October 07, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
TomHanksAbscessedToothGetsCastAway

Did you see the move Cast Away starring Tom Hanks? If so, you probably remember the scene where Hanks, stranded on a remote island, knocks out his own abscessed tooth — with an ice skate, no less — to stop the pain. Recently, Dear Doctor TV interviewed Gary Archer, the dental technician who created that special effect and many others.

“They wanted to have an abscess above the tooth with all sorts of gunk and pus and stuff coming out of it,” Archer explained. “I met with Tom and I took impressions [of his mouth] and we came up with this wonderful little piece. It just slipped over his own natural teeth.” The actor could flick it out with his lower tooth when the time was right during the scene. It ended up looking so real that, as Archer said, “it was not for the easily squeamish!”

That’s for sure. But neither is a real abscess, which is an infection that becomes sealed off beneath the gum line. An abscess may result from a trapped piece of food, uncontrolled periodontal (gum) disease, or even an infection deep inside a tooth that has spread to adjacent periodontal tissues. In any case, the condition can cause intense pain due to the pressure that builds up in the pus-filled sac. Prompt treatment is required to relieve the pain, keep the infection from spreading to other areas of the face (or even elsewhere in the body), and prevent tooth loss.

Treatment involves draining the abscess, which usually stops the pain immediately, and then controlling the infection and removing its cause. This may require antibiotics and any of several in-office dental procedures, including gum surgery, a root canal, or a tooth extraction. But if you do have a tooth that can’t be saved, we promise we won’t remove it with an ice skate!

The best way to prevent an abscess from forming in the first place is to practice conscientious oral hygiene. By brushing your teeth twice each day for two minutes, and flossing at least once a day, you will go a long way towards keeping harmful oral bacteria from thriving in your mouth.

If you have any questions about gum disease or abscesses, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Periodontal (Gum) Abscesses” and “Confusing Tooth Pain.”


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
October 06, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  

Many of Dr. Raymond A. Della Porta, II's patients want to know the difference between using over-the-counter teeth whitening solutions and having your teeth whitened at the dentist's office. If you're interested in having a brighter, more attractive smile, take a moment to Teeth Whiteninglearn more about the various options available to you.

Over-the-Counter Whitening Solutions
Some patients who want whiter teeth choose to use non-prescription whitening products that you can find at a pharmacy or supermarket. Over the counter whitening products include toothpastes, strips and dental trays with gels. Though these whitening solutions are cheap and allow you the freedom to whiten at home, they are often ineffective and require many applications before you see any difference in the way your teeth look. According to the ADA, these OTC products are commonly made with less than 10 percent hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide (a whitening agent).

In-Office Whitening Benefits 
Dr. Raymond A Della Porta offers in-office whitening at his Vero Beach dentist office. It is the preferred method for getting a whiter smile because it is quick, effective and safe. When you have your teeth whitened by your dentist, it can be completed in about an hour. The high powered bleaching gel (commonly made of 25 to 40 percent hydrogen peroxide) can improve the color of your teeth up to eight shades.

Another Solution to Consider
There is another solution available that makes it possible to get in-office whitening results at home. Your dentist can prescribe a take-home whitening kit. You will receive a whitening tray and bleaching gel for your teeth. The whitening process takes between two to four weeks, and is very effective as long as you follow the directions carefully.

Schedule a Whitening Appointment Today
If you opt for an in-office teeth whitening session or a take-home whitening kit, you must visit your dentist. Call the Vero Beach office of Dr. Raymond A Della Porta today at (772) 567-1025 to schedule a consultation.




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