Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options
Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options

Archive:

Tags

Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD FacebookRaymond A. Della Porta, II DMD TwitterRaymond A. Della Porta, II DMD Blog

Top 10 dentistry clinics in Vero Beach, FL 2015
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A winner of the 2015 Patients' Choice Awards for
Vero Beach Dentist
Verified by Opencare.com
 

Posts for: May, 2018

By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
May 25, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Crowns  

Dental CrownsSometimes a tooth is so damaged, you consider extraction. However, missing teeth harm your smile aesthetics, jaw bone and gum tissue integrity and overall oral function. Does your dentist in Vero Beach, Dr. Raymond Della Porta, offer an alternative to pulling a troublesome tooth? Yes, he does. Called the dental crown, this modern restoration keeps a smile intact and beautiful. Learn more about crowns here.

Your dental crown

If you have a severely decayed, infected, cracked, or oddly shaped tooth, you might consider crowning it. A dental crown covers the healthy portion of your tooth, allowing it to remain in place and avoiding the problems associated with dental extraction. Dental crowns restore dental implants, too, finish endodontically treated teeth (root canal therapy) and support prosthetics such as fixed bridgework.

Today's most popular crown material is porcelain because of its natural looks and excellent durability. Dr. Della Porta uses oral examination and digital X-ray imaging to determine if your tooth is healthy enough to save. If it is, he'll remove the decay, old filling material, and cracked enamel, shaping the tooth to receive the crown.

Most crown procedures remove about three-quarters of the tooth structure above the gum line to ensure proper bite and fit. Roots and bone structure remain in place even if the tooth has undergone root canal therapy to remove its diseased interior pulp.

This process is painless as Dr. Della Porta uses locally-injected anesthetic to numb the tooth. Also, he takes oral impressions to copy your tooth so the dental lab can correctly make your restoration. Most crown patients wear a temporary restoration to protect their teeth while their crowns are made.

To install your new crown, your dentist gently removes the temporary, and using a strong bonding adhesive, places the new crown over your tooth. He makes sure the color, size, and shape blend in with your other teeth, and he adjusts the restoration as needed.

Caring for a crown

Brush it, floss it, and be gentle with it. In other words, crown care is really basic. Treat it like your other teeth, and be sure to see your dentist, Dr. Della Porta and his team in Vero Beach, twice a year for your routine check-up and hygienic cleaning. Your beautiful crown should last ten years or even longer, say dentists at the Cleveland Clinic, but longevity depends a bit on location, too. Crowns on front teeth tend to last longer than crowns on molars.

Keep that tooth

Find out if Dr. Raymond Della Porta can save your ailing tooth. Contact his office in Vero Beach, FL, today for a personal consultation on a fully restored smile. Call (772) 567-1025.


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
May 24, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
SealantsCouldProtectYourChildsTeethFromFutureProblems

Teeth lost to tooth decay can have devastating consequences for a child’s dental health. Not only can it disrupt their current nutrition, speech and social interaction, it can also skew their oral development for years to come.

Fortunately, we have a number of preventive tools to curb decay in young children. One of the most important of these, dental sealants, has been around for decades. We apply these resin or glass-like material coatings to the pits and crevices of teeth (especially molars) to help prevent the buildup of bacterial plaque in areas where bacteria tend to thrive.

Applying sealants is a simple and pain-free process. We first brush the coating in liquid form onto the teeth’s surface areas we wish to protect. We then use a special curing light to harden the sealant and create a durable seal.

So how effective are sealants in preventing tooth decay? Two studies in recent years reviewing dental care results from thousands of patients concluded sealants could effectively reduce cavities even four years after their application. Children who didn’t receive sealants had cavities at least three times the rate of those who did.

Sealant applications, of course, have some expense attached to them. However, it’s far less than the cost for cavity filling and other treatments for decay, not to mention future treatment costs resulting from previous decay. What’s more important, though, is the beneficial impact sealants can have a child’s dental health now and on into adulthood. That’s why sealants are recommended by both the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

And while sealants are effective, they’re only one part of a comprehensive strategy to promote your child’s optimum dental health. Daily brushing and flossing, a “tooth-friendly” diet and regular dental cleanings and checkups are also necessary in helping to keep your child’s teeth healthy and free of tooth decay.

If you would like more information on preventing tooth decay in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
May 14, 2018
Category: Oral Health
IncreaseYourImplantsSuccessChancesbyKeepingYourGumsHealthy

If you’ve just received a dental implant restoration, congratulations! This proven smile-changer is not only life-like, it’s also durable: more than 95% of implants survive at least 10 years. But beware: periodontal (gum) disease could derail that longevity.

Gum disease is triggered by dental plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles that builds up on teeth. Left untreated the infection weakens gum attachment to teeth and causes supporting bone loss, eventually leading to possible tooth loss. Something similar holds true for an implant: although the implant itself can’t be affected by disease, the gums and bone that support it can. And just as a tooth can be lost, so can an implant.

Gum disease affecting an implant is called peri-implantitis (“peri”–around; implant “itis”–inflammation). Usually beginning with the surface tissues, the infection can advance (quite rapidly) below the gum line to eventually weaken the bone in which the implant has become integrated (a process known as osseointegration). As the bone deteriorates, the implant loses the secure hold created through osseointegration and may eventually give way.

As in other cases of gum disease, the sooner we detect peri-implantitis the better our chances of preserving the implant. That’s why at the first signs of a gum infection—swollen, reddened or bleeding gums—you should contact us at once for an appointment.

If you indeed have peri-implantitis, we’ll manually identify and remove all plaque and calculus (tartar) fueling the infection, which might also require surgical access to deeper plaque deposits. We may also need to decontaminate microscopic ridges found on the implant surface. These are typically added by the implant manufacturer to boost osseointegration, but in the face of a gum infection they can become havens for disease-causing bacteria to grow and hide.

Of course, the best way to treat peri-implantitis is to attempt to prevent it through daily brushing and flossing, and at least twice a year (or more, if we recommend it) dental visits for thorough cleanings and checkups. Keeping its supporting tissues disease-free will boost your implant’s chances for a long and useful life.

If you would like more information on caring for your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gum Disease can Cause Dental Implant Failure.”


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
May 04, 2018
Category: Oral Health
JamieFoxxChipsaTooth-ThisTimebyAccident

Some people are lucky — they never seem to have a mishap, dental or otherwise. But for the rest of us, accidents just happen sometimes. Take actor Jamie Foxx, for example. A few years ago, he actually had a dentist intentionally chip one of his teeth so he could portray a homeless man more realistically. But recently, he got a chipped tooth in the more conventional way… well, conventional in Hollywood, anyway. It happened while he was shooting the movie Sleepless with co-star Michelle Monaghan.

“Yeah, we were doing a scene and somehow the action cue got thrown off or I wasn't looking,” he told an interviewer. “But boom! She comes down the pike. And I could tell because all this right here [my teeth] are fake. So as soon as that hit, I could taste the little chalkiness, but we kept rolling.” Ouch! So what's the best way to repair a chipped tooth? The answer it: it all depends…

For natural teeth that have only a small chip or minor crack, cosmetic bonding is a quick and relatively easy solution. In this procedure, a tooth-colored composite resin, made of a plastic matrix with inorganic glass fillers, is applied directly to the tooth's surface and then hardened or “cured” by a special light. Bonding offers a good color match, but isn't recommended if a large portion of the tooth structure is missing. It's also less permanent than other types of restoration, but may last up to 10 years.

When more of the tooth is missing, a crown or dental veneer may be a better answer. Veneers are super strong, wafer-thin coverings that are placed over the entire front surface of the tooth. They are made in a lab from a model of your teeth, and applied in a separate procedure that may involve removal of some natural tooth material. They can cover moderate chips or cracks, and even correct problems with tooth color or spacing.

A crown is the next step up: It's a replacement for the entire visible portion of the tooth, and may be needed when there's extensive damage. Like veneers, crowns (or caps) are made from models of your bite, and require more than one office visit to place; sometimes a root canal may also be needed to save the natural tooth. However, crowns are strong, natural looking, and can last many years.

But what about teeth like Jamie's, which have already been restored? That's a little more complicated than repairing a natural tooth. If the chip is small, it may be possible to smooth it off with standard dental tools. Sometimes, bonding material can be applied, but it may not bond as well with a restoration as it will with a natural tooth; plus, the repaired restoration may not last as long as it should. That's why, in many cases, we will advise that the entire restoration be replaced — it's often the most predictable and long-lasting solution.

Oh, and one more piece of advice: Get a custom-made mouthguard — and use it! This relatively inexpensive device, made in our office from a model of your own teeth, can save you from a serious mishap… whether you're doing Hollywood action scenes, playing sports or just riding a bike. It's the best way to protect your smile from whatever's coming at it!

If you have questions about repairing chipped teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Artistic Repair of Chipped Teeth With Composite Resin” and “Porcelain Veneers.”




Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD

 

Read more about Raymond A Della Porta

Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.