Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options
Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options

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Posts for: April, 2019

By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
April 29, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
CrazyLittleThingCalledHyperdontia

The movie Bohemian Rhapsody celebrates the iconic rock band Queen and its legendary lead vocalist, Freddie Mercury. But when we see pictures of the flamboyant singer, many fans both old and new may wonder—what made Freddie’s toothy smile look the way it did? Here’s the answer: The singer was born with four extra teeth at the back of his mouth, which caused his front teeth to be pushed forward, giving him a noticeable overbite.

The presence of extra teeth—more than 20 primary (baby) teeth or 32 adult teeth—is a relatively rare condition called hyperdontia. Sometimes this condition causes no trouble, and an extra tooth (or two) isn’t even recognized until the person has an oral examination. In other situations, hyperdontia can create problems in the mouth such as crowding, malocclusion (bad bite) and periodontal disease. That’s when treatment may be recommended.

Exactly what kind of treatment is needed? There’s a different answer for each individual, but in many cases the problem can be successfully resolved with tooth extraction (removal) and orthodontic treatment (such as braces).┬áSome people may be concerned about having teeth removed, whether it’s for this problem or another issue. But in skilled hands, this procedure is routine and relatively painless.

Teeth aren’t set rigidly in the jawbone like posts in cement—they are actually held in place dynamically by a fibrous membrane called the periodontal ligament. With careful manipulation of the tooth, these fibers can be dislodged and the tooth can be easily extracted. Of course, you won’t feel this happening because extraction is done under anesthesia (often via a numbing shot). In addition, you may be given a sedative or anti-anxiety medication to help you relax during the procedure.

After extraction, some bone grafting material may be placed in the tooth socket and gauze may be applied to control bleeding; sutures (stitches) are sometimes used as well. You’ll receive instructions on medication and post-extraction care before you go home. While you will probably feel discomfort in the area right after the procedure, in a week or so the healing process will be well underway.

Sometimes, dental problems like hyperdontia need immediate treatment because they can negatively affect your overall health; at other times, the issue may be mainly cosmetic. Freddie Mercury declined treatment because he was afraid dental work might interfere with his vocal range. But the decision to change the way your smile looks is up to you; after an examination, we can help you determine what treatment options are appropriate for your own situation.

If you have questions about tooth extraction or orthodontics, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Simple Tooth Extraction” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
April 19, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: smile makeover  
TakeaLookintoYourFuturewithaTrialSmile

While the imagination is one of our most powerful mental abilities, many people still find it difficult to “see” in their minds a future dramatically different from the present. That could be the case with a “smile makeover”—it’s not easy to imagine how proposed changes to your teeth and gums can affect your entire look.

Computer imaging software has helped in this regard. Starting with a photo of your current smile, we can manipulate it with imaging software to show you what any proposed dental work might look like after completion. But imaging technology has its limits: you’re viewing a static, two-dimensional image that can’t really show you how your new smile looks as your mouth and face move in a three-dimensional space.

There is another way, and although it may add to your treatment costs it can give you an even more realistic view of your future appearance. Known simply as a “trial smile,” it’s a procedure in which we temporarily place life-like bonding material called composite resin on your current teeth. We shape, cure and sculpt the resin to produce a three-dimensional model of what your future smile will look like.

A trial smile gives you a chance to experience in real time how this future smile looks and feels as you smile or talk. And although we’ll have to remove it before you leave, we can photograph your new look for you to show to family and friends later for their reaction.

There are a couple of important reasons to have a trial smile. First, it gives us both a chance to review how the proposed changes may enhance your appearance, and whether we need to alter those plans in any way. It’s a kind of dress rehearsal where we can improve the “script” before the actual performance.

Just as important, a trial smile can help reassure you about what to expect from the outcome. You’ll have a fairly accurate idea of how you’ll look, which will help reduce any apprehensions you might have.

If you’d like to include a trial smile in your treatment plan, please feel free to discuss it with us. It can be money well spent to ensure you’ll be satisfied and delighted with your new smile.

If you would like more information on ways to restore your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Testing Your Smile Makeover.”


By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
April 09, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: mouthguards  
AprilIsNationalFacialProtectionMonth

April brings the perfect weather to get outside and play. Fittingly, April is also National Facial Protection Month. Whether you prefer softball or basketball, skateboarding or ultimate frisbee, don't forget your most important piece of equipment: a mouthguard to protect your face and your smile!

In an instant, a blow to the mouth can cause a dental injury that is painful to endure and expensive to treat. In just about any sporting activity, your mouth could come into contact with a piece of equipment, another person or the ground. That's why the American Dental Association and the Academy for Sports Dentistry recommend using a mouthguard when participating in any of over 30 activities, including some that aren't typically considered contact sports, like volleyball and bike riding.

Common sense, observation and scientific research support the use of mouthguards during sporting activities—but are the ones you get from your dentist really any better than the kind you can grab off the shelf at a sporting goods store or drugstore? The answer is yes!

In a 2018 experiment, researchers created a model of the human head to test how direct impact affects the teeth, jaws and skull. They compared the effects of impact when using no mouthguard, when using a custom-made mouthguard available from the dentist, and when using a stock mouthguard. They also tested mouthguards of different thicknesses. The results? The experimenters determined that any mouthguard is better than no mouthguard and that custom mouthguards available from the dental office are more effective than off-the-shelf mouthguards in protecting teeth, jaws and skull from impact. They also found that the thicker the mouthguard, the better the protection.

Although custom mouthguards are more expensive than the kind you can buy at the corner store, the difference in protection, durability, comfort and fit is well worth the investment. We consider your (or your child's) individual needs, take a precise model of your mouth and provide you with a custom-fit mouthguard of the highest quality material.

Don't ruin your game. A mouthguard can go a long way in protecting your teeth and mouth from injury. If you would like more information about a sports mouthguard, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Mouthguards” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”




Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD

 

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