Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options
Vero Beach, FL Dentist
Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
1300 36th Street, Suite F
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(772) 567-1025
Dentist in Vero Beach, FL Call For Financing Options

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By Raymond A. Della Porta, II DMD
September 25, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Implant DentistryWhile it might seem that a lot of our procedures are the luck of advanced technology and state-of-the-art equipment, it doesn’t mean that we were the first to come up with these dental treatments. Tooth loss has been a dental problem that has plagued us for centuries; however, we weren’t the first to think of a clever way to replace missing teeth. In fact, archaeologists have just discovered that ancient Celts may have also invented their own form of dental implants back in the 3rd century BC.
 
In a Celtic burial site in the north-central town of Le Chêne, France, archaeologists discovered something astonishing—a decorative tooth belonging to the skeleton of a young woman. While they are still trying to figure out what the tooth was made of, one thing is certain: the tooth was used to enhance this person’s smile. Since the tooth was used to replace one of the most visible teeth in the woman’s smile, it was most likely used for aesthetic purposes. This means that the aesthetics surrounding a healthy smile are anything but new. The appearance of a smile is just as important now as it was back in 200 BC.
 

Socialite Smile

This excavation team that set out for the Le Chêne gravesite unearthed a skeleton of a young woman who couldn’t have been more than 30 years old when she died. The skeleton was most likely an elite member of the Celtic society, as she was decked out in several bronze brooches, bracelets and rings. While the skeleton wasn’t well preserved, her teeth still remained reasonably intact with no sign of wear, tartar or cavities. As they took a closer look inside her mouth, they found a tiny iron pin where one of her incisors would have been. This suggested to the team that it was part of a dental implant.
 

The Toothy Mystery Continues

Since there were no signs of trauma, it’s possible that this woman lost her tooth from a fall or a punch. Also, this dental implant was most likely inserted while the woman was still alive; however, there is a possibility that it was placed there after her death.
 
They are also trying to determine the tooth’s material; however, based on the century, it’s most likely that the ancient Celtic elites sported gold teeth. During trading routes, the Celts often came in contact with and admired the Etruscan’s (Pre-Roman) love of decorative smiles, and in turn, may also have copied their style for bejeweled smiles.
 
While it seems only obvious to mention that people have tacked on a lot of importance when it comes to the condition of their smiles, in this day and age we are lucky that we don’t have to deal with these similar procedures without the use of anesthesia. Dental implants in Vero Beach won’t promise you toothy bling, but it will promise you a complete and healthy smile, and a pain-free procedure. If you’re interested in finding out more about dental implants, call our Vero Beach dental office today.
 

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